Jamaican Dollar rise again

Foreign exchange trading on Thursday saw the equivalent of US$42.7 million entering the market and US$39.6 million being sold, bringing the surplus for the week to date to US$20.2 million.
Traders purchased United States dollar in the amount of $41.1 million and sold $37.2 million resulting in a net intake of US$24 million for the week to date. Trading resulted in another day of appreciation for the local currency with the selling rate of the US dollar being J$129.15 versus J$129.21 on Wednesday. Today’s gain for the local dollar is the 15th trading day for June, that the rate has appreciated.

J$ revaluation on the way

The value of the Jamaican dollar continues to appreciate in June, with the selling rate of the US dollar falling to J$129.21 at the close on Wednesday, down from J$130.14 at the close on the last day of the May.
The rate for the local dollar has appreciated on every day of the month except for a 1 cent rise on the 14th.
Helping with the fall in the value of the US dollar against the local currency is net inflows in each week of June. In the first full week of June, ending on the 9th net inflows into the system were US$21 million equivalent and for the US dollar $14 million, the second week, US$8.5 million and US$5 million respectively and so far of the third week, USS$17 million and US$20 million respectively.

BOJ sells US$80m up to J$129.91


Bank of Jamaica has USD80 million through its new Foreign Exchange auction system between May 4th to 9th to Authorised and Cambios Dealers.
The central Bank sates that after inviting bids for USD on Tuesday, the Bank through its Trading Room sold US$30 million to Authorised Dealers and Cambios at a rate of J$129.91 to US$1. On Thursday, May 4th and Friday, May 5th, the Bank sold US$50 million to Authorised Dealers and Cambios via its trading room. On May 4, US$30 million was sold at $129.85 and on the 5th US$20 million was sold at the same rate.

Increased FX cost for Jamaican banks

Bank of Jamaica announced changes to the cash reserves and liquid assets that deposit-taking institutions are required to hold against foreign currency liabilities effective March 1.
According to the central bank the change will see a three percentage points increase to the current requirement. The adjustment will be in two steps, beginning with an increase of two percentage points on the first business day in March 2017, with the remaining one percentage point will be effected on the first business day in April 2017.
The adjustment is aimed at reducing the incentive to hold foreign currency liabilities.
No change is being made to the reserve requirements applicable to Jamaican dollar prescribed liabilities.
During the last three months of 2016, Bank of Jamaica gradually increased the cash reserves and liquid assets requirements for foreign currency liabilities in the banking system to bring them in line with the reserve requirements for Jamaican dollar liabilities. This removed the bias in the structure of the reserves requirements that favoured foreign-currency deposits.
At December 2016, the cash and liquid assets reserve requirements were twelve per cent (12%) and twenty-six per cent (26%), respectively, for both foreign currency and Jamaican dollar liabilities. Remuneration for foreign currency cash reserves was also discontinued, bringing it into conformity with the treatment for Jamaican dollar cash reserves.
The net effect is that it will cost banks more to hold foreign currency than before and is likely to drive up lending rates for foreign currency loans. Depositors will most likely see a dip in the interest they currently earn on foreign exchange deposits. The move will mean more funds will be available in the market for either the build-up of the country’s reserves or a further strengthening in the value of the Jamaican dollar. Real estate and stocks will definitely benefit from the changes as well.
The change come partially, as commercial banks accumulated large pool of surplus foreign currencies since mid-2016, forcing the central bank to issue bands to pull the funds out of the system, as well as the fact that Jamaican have increasingly been dollarizing their financial activities.

Jamaican dollar gains value

Up to the end of foreign exchange trading on Monday, Jamaica enjoyed a surplus of US$157 million for January. On Monday the central bank reported net inflows US$3.9 million with the selling rates for the main currencies for the Jamaican dollar gaining but for the euro.
At the close of the market, dealers bought the equivalent of US$39,284,459 of all currencies and sold just US$35,398,981, compared to US$50,312,663 purchased and US$32,969,840 sold on Friday.
In US dollar trading, dealers bought US$35,900,623 compared to US$47,964,301 on Friday. The buying rate for the US dollar fell 33 cents to close at $127.52. A total of US$33,452,927 was sold versus US$32,074,678 on Friday, with the selling rate falling by a much smaller level than for purchases with a fall of 7 cents to $128.35. The Canadian dollar buying rate fell 87 cents to $93.98, with dealers buying C$1,471,931 and selling C$964,733 at an average rate that lost 15 cents to end at $97.75. The average rate for buying the British Pound fell 31 cents to $158.02 for the purchase of £1,694,767 while £852,079 was sold with a decline of 60 cents, to end at $159.90.
At the end of trading on Monday, dealers sold €124,122, with the selling rate for the Euro, closing with a gain of 6 cents to $136.91, according to data from Bank of Jamaica. Dealers purchased €173,210 of the European common currency at $136.85 after rising $2.47. The US dollar equivalent of other currencies traded, amounts to US$21,471 being bought and selling of US$17,304.
Highs & Lows| Notable changes to the highest and lowest rates for the regularly traded foreign currencies on Monday, include a drop in the lowest selling rate of the US dollar by $1.35 to $121.65. The highest buying rate for the British Pound fell $2.62 to $161.20 while the lowest selling rate rose $3 to $155. The highest selling rate for the Euro rose $6.70 to $146.30 and the lowest selling rate rose $2 to $132.

Healthy net FX inflows continue

Up to the end of foreign exchange trading on Friday, Jamaica enjoyed a surplus of US$153 million for January. On Friday the central bank reported net inflows US$17 million with the selling rates for the main currencies for the Jamaican dollar gaining but for the Canadian dollar.
At the close of the market, dealers bought the equivalent of US$50,312,663 of all currencies and sold just US$32,969,840, compared to US$40,366,101 purchased and US$34,607,120 sold on Thursday.
In US dollar trading, dealers bought US$47,964,301 compared to US$37,146,996 on Thursday. The buying rate for the US dollar fell 10 cents to close at $127.85. A total of US$32,074,678 was sold versus US$33,530,844 on Thursday, with the selling rate falling by 13 cents to $128.42. The Canadian dollar buying rate fell 29 cents to $94.85, with dealers buying C$1,110,230 and selling C$586,246 at an average rate that climbed 37 cents to end at $97.90. The average rate for buying the British Pound rose 93 cents to $158.33 for the purchase of £1,088,337 while £241,103 was sold with a decline of 94 cents, to end at $160.50.
At the end of trading on Friday, dealers sold €135,899, with the selling rate for the Euro, closing with a fall of $1.63 to $136.85, according to data from Bank of Jamaica. Dealers purchased €153,437 of the European common currency at $133.18 after rising $2.70. The US dollar equivalent of other currencies traded, amounts to US$17,035 being bought and selling of US$2,116.
Highs & Lows| Notable changes to the highest and lowest rates for the regularly traded foreign currencies on Friday, include a jump in the lowest selling rate of the US dollar by $19.27 to $123. The highest buying rate for the British Pound jumped $1.82 to $163.82 while the lowest selling rate dropped $3.50 to $152. The highest buying rate for the Euro fell $4.47 to close at $135.30, the highest selling rate fell $6.70 to $139.60 and the lowest selling rate lost $3 to $130.

Jamaican$ made gains on Monday

On Monday the Jamaica’s central bank reported net inflows US$13 million with the buying and selling rates for the main currencies for the Jamaican dollar gaining but for the euro.
At the close of the market, dealers bought the equivalent of US$46,846,024 of all currencies and sold US$33,710,044, compared to US$73,405,937 purchased and US$70,539,453 sold on Friday.
In US dollar trading, dealers bought US$41,767,700 compared to US$70,170,675 on Friday. The buying rate for the US dollar fell 57 cents to close at $127.52. A total of US$31,452,380 was sold versus US$69,102,218 on Friday, with the selling rate falling by 11 cents to $128.44. The Canadian dollar buying rate fell 36 cents to $93.18, with dealers buying C$2,332,284 and selling C$1,056,715 at an average rate that slipped 41 cents to end at $95.89. The average rate for buying the British Pound declined 99 cents to $154.85 for the purchase of £2,235,899 while £939,607 was sold with a decline of 47 cents to end at $156.46.
At the end of trading on Monday, dealers sold €287,843, with the selling rate for the Euro, closing with a rise of 3 cents to $135.18, according to data from Bank of Jamaica. Dealers purchased €596,051 of the European common currency at $133.20 after rising $3.78. The US dollar equivalent of other currencies traded, amounts to US$36,122 being bought and selling of US$21,146.
Highs & Lows| Notable changes to the highest and lowest rates for the regularly traded foreign currencies on Monday, include a fall in the lowest selling rate of the US dollar by $16.88 to $103.12. A fall of $3.10 in the highest buying rate for the Canadian dollar to end at $96.90 while the lowest selling rate declined by $2.30 to $90. The lowest selling rate for the British Pound dropped $3 to $150.50 while the highest buying rate for the Euro put on $6.70 to close at $140 and the lowest selling rate lost $3 to $126.80.

Jamaica’s FX Reserves jump in December

Jamaica’s Net International Reserves shot up by US$163 million in December to hit US$2.72 billion with gross reserves climbing to US$3.29 billion.
The increase for December is just US$15 million less that the net inflows of foreign exchange, the financial system generated in the month. The reserves represent 38.40 weeks of imports of goods and 22.27 weeks of goods and services. Data of daily trading of foreign exchange collated by IC Insider.com show that net inflows of all currencies, amounted to a surplus of US$178 million in December last year.
Jamaica started 2016 with net reserves of US$2.437 billion, strong demand between April and May saw the amount dipping to a low of US$2.265 billion in June, as the country’s central bank sold funds into the market to meet demand.

Jamaican$ ended mixed on Friday

On Friday the central bank reported net inflows US$2.9 million with the buying and selling rates for the main currencies for the Jamaican dollar being mixed.
At the close of the market, dealers bought the equivalent of US$73,405,937 of all currencies and sold US$70,539,453, compared to US$36,967,257 purchased and US$39,708,349 sold on Thursday.
In US dollar trading, dealers bought US$70,170,675 compared to US$30,748,354 on Thursday. The buying rate for the US dollar rose 60 cents to close at $128.09. A total of US$69,102,218 was sold versus US$35,784,226 on Thursday, with the selling rate remaining unchanged at $128.55. The Canadian dollar buying rate fell $1.59 to $93.54, with dealers buying C$1,672,927 and selling C$680,212 at an average rate that slipped 41 cents to end at $96.30. The average rate for buying the British Pound climbed just 5 cents to $155.84 for the purchase of £1,529,299 while £360,627 was sold with a decline of 30 cents to end at $156.93.
At the end of trading on Friday, dealers sold €456,848 with the selling rate for the Euro, closing with a rise of $2.02 to $135.15, according to data from Bank of Jamaica. Dealers purchased €123,157 of the European common currency at $129.42 after falling 14 cents. The US dollar equivalent of other currencies traded, amounts to US$28,507 being bought and selling of US$7,109.
Highs & Lows| Notable changes to the highest and lowest rates for the regularly traded foreign currencies on Friday, include a rise in the lowest selling rate of the US dollar by $16.68 to $120. A rise of $1.50 in the highest buying rate for the Canadian dollar to end at $100 while the lowest selling rate grew $1.30 to $92.30. The highest buying rate for the British Pound dropped $1.80 to $158 and the lowest selling rate rose $2.50 to $153.50, while the lowest selling rate for the Euro put on $3.55 to close at $129.80.

Jamaican$ loses ground on Thursday

On Thursday the central bank reported net outflows US$2.7 million and an across the board fall in the value for the Jamaican dollar except for a gain in the selling rate of the euro.
At the close of the market, dealers bought the equivalent of US$36,967,257 of all currencies and sold US$39,708,349, compared to US$85,048,825 purchased and US$70,824,719 sold on Wednesday.
In US dollar trading, dealers bought US$30,748,354 compared to US$76,958,108 on Wednesday. The buying rate for the US dollar rose 18 cents to close at $127.49. A total of US$35,784,226 was sold versus US$64,143,542 on Wednesday, with the selling rate rising 21 cents to $128.55. The Canadian dollar buying rate climbed $3.03 to $95.13, with dealers buying C$3,819,861 and selling C$2,730,497 at an average rate that rose $1.61 to end at $96.71. The average rate for buying the British Pound climbed $1.03 to $155.79 for the purchase of £2,574,231 while £1,415,888 was sold with a rise of 60 cents to end at $157.23.
At the end of trading on Thursday, dealers sold €108,162 with the selling rate for the Euro, closing with a decline of $1.11 to $133.13, according to data from Bank of Jamaica. Dealers purchased €190,099 of the European common currency at $129.56 after gaining $1.62. The US dollar equivalent of other currencies traded, amounts to US$29,692 being bought and selling of US$25,989.
Highs & Lows| Notable changes to the highest and lowest rates for the regularly traded foreign currencies on Thursday, include a rise of $1 in the highest buying rate for the Canadian dollar to end at $98.50. The highest buying rate for the British Pound dropped $2.39 to $159.80, the lowest selling rate fell $1.20 to $151, while the highest buying rate for the Euro added $1 to end at $133, the highest selling rate declined by $1.30 to end at $140.40 and the lowest selling rate put on $12.11 to close at $126.25.