April T-Bill cacelled as GOJ cash surges

Regular issue of Treasury bills would normally be held by the 19th of April but none were offered this time around based on the absence of an announcement by the Central Bank of Jamaica.
When the last issue of Treasury bill closed on Friday, 15 March 2017, the Bank of Jamaica stated that applications for the next offer of Government of Jamaica Treasury Bills must be lodged at the Bank of Jamaica by 10:45 a.m. on Wednesday, 19 April 2017. Bank of Jamaica acting on behalf of the government would make an announcement of the date and amounts for the upcoming issue. The website of Bank of Jamaica carries information when the public is being offered news bills and the result of the issue, a check on the site throws no information on the April issue, with no announcement no explanation for cancelation of the issue.
At the end of February, data out of the Ministry of Finance showed a budgetary surplus of $17.5 billion in revenues above forecast and a cash deficit of $5.5 billion. With March projected to generate large net inflows of revenues over outflows, the central government would not need to borrow from the financial market. Inflows was projected at $72 billion and expenditure at $35 billion for March, if achieved would result in a surplus of $30 billion for the financial year.

Stocks shrug off interest rate rise

Ja inf-stks 11-16.The latest issue of Treasury bill offerings saw the 182 instrument climbing 40 basis points to 6.2 percent while the 91 days T-bill rose marginally to virtually hold at 5.70 percent just a tad above the average in October.
The 28 day T-bill slipped from 5.78 percent to 5.70 percent. At the same time the main market All Jamaica Composite index continues to climb with some companies posting good increased profits.
The rise in the 192 days instrument comes against the back drop of stability in the exchange rate for November to date, very low inflation that seems headed to around than 2 percent for 2016. The change in rates also comes against the change in Bank of Jamaica policy to offer Certificate of Deposits daily to the market to bid on.

Treasury bill rates drop

Rates of Government of Jamaica Treasury bills fell on the 91 day and 192 days instruments the government have been auctioning for some time, but rose slightly on the 28 days tenner as the amount applied for was well below the amount of $400 million offered.

182 days T-bill rates are down more than 50% since March 2014

182 days T-bill rates are down more than 50% since March 2014

The fall have brought the 182 days instrument down by 15.4 percent since December 2014, to 6.04 percent and the 91 days by 14 percent, down to 5.97 percent. The 28 day instrument is down by just 6 percent to 5.96 percent over the similar period.
Treasury bill rates have declined by 50.78 percent since peaking in March 2014 for the 182 day instrument based on the average rate on the latest offering. At the December auction, the average rate on the 91 days bills fell 18.8 basis points compared to the November rate. The 182 days instrument enjoyed only a 0.5 basis point fall and the 28 day instrument rose by 5.5 basis points.
A total of only $347,996,800 chased the $400 million on offer for the 28 days bills, $717 million went after the $400 million on offer for the 90 days instruments and $557 million went after the $400 million offered for 182 days.

Calculating Treasury Bill interest income

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GOJ TbillNew issues of Treasury Bills are offered on a regular basis by governments all over the world, to fund their short term financial obligations, but not everyone knows how the income payable on them are computed. Unlike regular bonds where the rate of interest to be paid is stated on the face of the instrument, that is not the case with treasury bills. .
The bills are usually of 30 days, 90 days, 182 days and 365-days duration but may vary by a day or two in each case. The rate of interest paid on these instruments is determined by an auction system. At these auctions investors predetermine what rate of interest they want and made an offer in writing ahead of the closing time prior to the bids being opened. The lowest rates are satisfied first. If the amount offered for sale by the government is oversubscribed, then those with rates that are higher than the rates on those amounts that equate to the amount offered, are rejected.
These bills are sold at a discount below the face value that the holder receives at maturity and requires the buyers to quote their bids lower than the maturing amount. For example one may bid at a price of $97 per $100 of 91 days Treasury Bills giving a discount of 3 percent. The discount rate is the difference between the lower price paid for a security and the security’s face value, adjusted for the maturity of the issue. It is calculated as follows:
((face value-purchase price)/face value) x (365/term) x 100 = discount rate. Using this example the discount rate for an instrument of 91 days will be computed as follows: ((100-97)/100) x (365/91) x 100 = 12.03%. ((face value-purchase price)/purchase price) x (365/term) x 100 = yield. The annualized yield, or the actual rate of return per year, is calculated as follows: ((100-97)/97) x (365/91) x 100 = 12.41%.
The amount of treasury bills offered, are published by the central banks who act on behalf of the governments and may be purchased either directly by investors or through brokers. There are usually set dates each month for these issues. Information published for each tender are those relating to the dates of issue, maturity, the closing and settlement.

Interest rate rise & fall

Interest rates on the latest issues of treasury bills by the Government of Jamaica on the 15th and 24th of January 2014 to provide funding for $1.2 billion showed mixed results.

Three offerings were available of $400 million each for duration of 28 days, 91 and 182 days. The rate on the 91 day instrument resulted in an average rate of 7.4292 percent a slight decline compared with the last issue of same duration, the rate for the 182 day instrument came out at 8.71734 percent reflecting a rise over the 8.25335 percent that obtained at the December 2013 auction, the 91 day issue resulted in an average rate of 7.5338 percent.

TBills280x150Investors received rates as high as 7.77998 percent for the 30 day T-Bill and as high as 10 percent for the longer dated instrument. Just over 11 percent of investors’ funds benefited from the higher yield for the 90 day paper buy. It was as high as 6.969 percent for the short term T Bills.

On January 15, an issue of a 28 day Treasury bill resulted in an average rate of 6.12 percent similar to the issue in December 2013 with a 6.12 percent average rate for the 28 day offer maturing in January and continues to compare favourably with the 6.2522 percent that obtained at the offer in November.

Related Posts | Interest rate eases

Interest rate eases

Rates on the most recent Treasury Bills fell in the latest offering by the Government of Jamaica.

The rate for the January Treasury bill came out at 6.12 percent compared to 6.2522 percent in December. Investors on Wednesday, 15 January, applied to purchase $400 million 30 days Government of Jamaica Treasury Bills dated Friday, 17 January 2014. This resulted in the average yield of 6.11877 percent. However, yield went as high as 6.29577 percent. A total of $567,065,100 was submitted by applicants in their bid to obtain the instruments.

Related post | T-bill rates mixed at auction

T-bill rates mixed at auction

Interest on Treasury bills rose again in the latest auction held on 21 August 2013. On offer were two instruments seeking to raise $400,000 each for 91 Days and the other of 185 Days duration. Both instruments were oversubscribed.

The average rates came out at 7.34, down from 7.995 percent for the 91 day at the July auction and is back at the level in June. This is a pretty sharp decline, as $771.75 million chased $400 million on offer. But investors who placed bids as high as 7.75 percent were able to get some of their bids filled. Full allotment took place at 7.74923 percent.

The 185 Days instrument came out at an average rate of 8.1255 percent, slightly up from the 182 days instrument issued in late July at 7.88 percent.  Investors, however, got rates ranging from 6.729 to 8.50 percent in full and partial allotment as high as 8.657 98 percent. A total of $400 million were on offer and bids amounting $768 million were tendered.

Related posts | T-bill rates move up again

BOJ offers 3 new CDs

Bank of Jamaica will be offering three variable rate instruments commencing Friday, 26 July 2013 to Friday, 02 August 2013 as a continuation of open market operations. The announcement again comes at a time when it appears that authorised dealers are holding back on selling the foreign currency into the system as is evident for the past four days.

The instruments on offer are:

  1. A 186-day Certificate of Deposit, for an unlimited amount. The instrument re-prices quarterly at 0.15 percentage point above the three month GOJ Treasury Bill rate existing at the start of each re-pricing period. The initial coupon for the first three months is 7.50 per cent per annum.
  2. A 276-day Certificate of Deposit, for an unlimited amount. The instrument re-prices quarterly at 0.20 percentage point above the three month GOJ Treasury Bill rate existing at the start of each re-pricing period. The initial coupon for the first three months is 7.55 per cent per annum.
  3. An 18-month Certificate of Deposit, for an unlimited amount. The instrument re-prices quarterly at 0.25 percentage point above the three month GOJ Treasury Bill rate existing at the start of each re-pricing period. The initial coupon for the first three months is 7.60 per cent per annum.

T-bill rates move up again

Interest on Treasury bills rose again in the latest auction held on 24 July 2013. On offer were two instruments seeking to raise $400,000 each for 91 Days and the other of 182 Days duration. Both instruments were oversubscribed, unlike the auction in June when investors shun the longer dated issues.

In the July auction investors bid $700,977,500 for the 91 day issue and $ 513,898,400 for the 182 Days. The average rates came out at 7.995 percent for the 91 day bill this is up 64.5 basis points over the rate of 7.35 percent in the June auction. The 182 Days instrument came out at an average rate of 7.88 percent 76 basis points higher than the 7.12 percent average out turn in June. Investors however got rates ranging from 6.24999 to 7.84951 percent for the short date bill and 5.99999 to 8.74999 for the longer bill which were allotted in full. The rate reached as high as 7.995 percent for 24.2 percent of the allotment for the 91 day instrument and 9 percent for a very small portion of the 182 day t-bill.

Business sector expects rates to rise

A survey conducted in May 2013 on behalf of Bank of Jamaica, soliciting the views of executives of the private sector showed that the business sector expects the 180-day T-bill rates to increase to 6.5 percent in the three months hence, up from the 5.4 per cent expressed in the previous survey. In the May 2013 auction, the actual interest rate for the 180-day Treasury bills increased to 6.44 per cent from 6.39 per cent in the April 2013 auction.

The majority of respondents expected that the Bank’s Open Market Operation (OMO) rate would remain the same over the next three months. This was similar to the views conveyed in the April and March 2013 surveys. The percentage of respondents that were of the view that the OMO rate would remain the same increased to 51.3 per cent from 43.0 per cent in the previous survey. The results from the overall survey about expectations for the OMO rate were largely corroborated by the views of respondents in the financial sector

BankofJamaicaBOJThe Statistical Institute of Jamaica (STATIN) undertakes surveys of businesses on behalf of the Bank of Jamaica to ascertain the expectations about variables which are likely to have an impact on inflation in the near-term. In this regard, the survey captures the perception of Chief Executive Officers, Managing Directors and Financial Controllers about the future movement of prices, current and future business conditions and the expected rate of increase in wages and salaries. These responses assist the Central Bank in charting future policy decisions.